Lean muscle diet plan #diet

7 day lean muscle diet plan

Monday
Breakfast: 45g oats with 300ml skimmed milk and 1tsp honey. 200ml apple juice.
Snack: 120g low-fat yoghurt with blueberries and honey.
Lunch: Grilled chicken (1 chicken breast) salad sandwich on wholemeal bread.
Snack: Smoothie: blend 25g whey protein, 80g raspberries, 80g blueberries, 50g blackberries and water.
Dinner: 120g tuna steak with stir-fried broccoli, mushrooms, green beans, sesame seeds and oil. 70g brown rice.
Snack: 250ml skimmed milk.
Daily total: 1,835 calories, 136g protein, 229g carbs, 33g fat

Tuesday
Breakfast: Smoothie: blend 25g whey protein, 300ml skimmed milk, 100g strawberries and a banana.
Snack: 120g low-fat yoghurt, blueberries and honey.
Lunch: Tuna sandwich on wholemeal bread. 200ml skimmed milk.
Snack: Mixed nuts, raisins and cranberries.
Dinner: 100g chicken, bacon and avocado salad.
Snack: 1 apple with 2tbsp natural peanut butter.
Daily total: 1,802 calories, 131g protein, 219g carbs, 37g fat

Wednesday
Breakfast: Smoothie: blend 25g whey protein, 300ml skimmed milk, 100g strawberries and a banana.
Snack: 90g mackerel on 1 slice of wholemeal toast.
Lunch: 1 apple. Chicken salad sandwich on wholemeal bread.
Snack: 1 banana.
Dinner: 120g fillet steak with spinach and 2 grilled tomatoes.
Snack: 100g low-fat cottage cheese and pineapple.
Daily total: 1,821 calories, 138g protein, 222g carbs, 35g fat

Thursday
Breakfast: 4 scrambled egg whites on 2 slices of wholemeal toast.
Snack: 1 low-fat yoghurt with blueberries and a handful of oats and honey.
Lunch: Smoothie: blend 25g whey protein, 80g raspberries, 80g blueberries, 50g blackberries and water. 30g brazil nuts.
Snack: 100g low-fat cottage cheese and pineapple.
Dinner: Tuna niçoise salad: 100g tuna, mixed salad leaves, plum tomatoes, a red pepper and 4 new potatoes.
Snack: 250ml skimmed milk.
Daily total: 1,835 calories, 136g protein, 229g carbs, 33g fat

Friday
Breakfast: 45g oats with 300ml skimmed milk and 1tsp honey.
Snack: 10 radishes with balsamic vinaigrette.
Lunch: 1 can of tuna with beetroot. 1 low-fat yoghurt.
Snack: Smoothie: blend 25g whey protein, 80g raspberries, 80g blueberries and 50g blackberries with water.
Dinner: 120g barbecue chicken kebab with peppers and 70g brown rice.
Snack: 100g cottage cheese and grapes.
Daily total: 1,808 calories, 133g protein, 219g carbs, 34g fat

Saturday
Breakfast: 2-egg omelette with cheese.
Snack: Smoothie: blend 25g protein, 1 apple, 50g blueberries, 50g blackberries and a banana with water.
Lunch: 90g sardines on 1 slice of wholemeal toast.
Snack: 150g raw carrots and hummus.
Dinner: 100g grilled salmon with green beans, asparagus and 70g brown rice.
Snack: 200ml skimmed milk.
Daily total: 1,822 calories, 135g protein, 221g carbs, 36g fat

Sunday
Breakfast: 4 scrambled egg whites on 2 slices of wholemeal toast. 1 grapefruit.
Snack: Smoothie: blend 25g protein, 300ml skimmed milk, 50g blueberries, 50g blackberries and a banana.
Lunch: Tuna sandwich on wholemeal bread. 1 pear.
Snack: Mixed nuts and fruit bar.
Dinner: 120g fillet steak with 1 small jacket potato, spinach and 1 grilled tomato.
Snack: 1 apple with 2tbsp natural peanut butter.
Daily total: 1,840 calories, 140g protein, 228g carbs, 39g fat

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How to stick to a diet

Barriers are things that get in the way of making a change and staying with it. Changing your eating habits takes time and practice. It?s normal to feel like you’ve slipped a little on your goals once in a while. But its important to stay on track and keep trying.

Finding your barriers and learning how to get around them can help you reach your healthy-eating goals.

Healthy Eating – Dealing With Barriers to Healthy Eating
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Barriers are things that get in the way of making a change and staying with it. Changing your eating habits takes time and practice. It?s normal to feel like you’ve slipped a little on your goals once in a while. But it?s important to stay on track and keep trying.

There are many things, such as emotional eating or easy access to fast food, that can make it hard to change how you eat.

Finding your barriers and learning how to get around them can help you reach your healthy-eating goals.

For more information, see:

Healthy Eating: Overcoming Barriers to Change.
What Influences How You Eat?
Emotional eating
Emotional eating means that you eat too much or too often for reasons other than hunger. You may eat because you’re sad, depressed, stressed, or lonely. Or you may use food as a reward. Food can be soothing and distract you from what’s really bothering you.

If you are an emotional eater, you may not listen to your body’s natural signals. You may eat more than you need or want.

To find out what causes you to eat this way, keep an eating journal for a week or two. Write down everything you eat, plus the time of day and what you were feeling right before you ate. This will help you identify things that trigger emotional eating.

You may want to talk to a counselor for more help in understanding your emotions and eating habits.

Easy access to less healthy food
It can be hard to eat healthy foods when fast food, vending-machine snacks, and processed foods are so easy to find. The good news is that there usually are healthy choices, even at fast-food restaurants.

Here are a few tips:

Learn which restaurants offer healthier choices. For example, choose fast-food restaurants that allow you to order a side salad instead of fries with your meal.

Have healthy snacks ready for when you get hungry. Keep healthy snacks with you at work or school, in your car, and at home. If you have a healthy snack easily available, you’ll be less likely to pick a candy bar or bag of crisps from a vending machine instead.

Lack of time

Lack of time is a common barrier to healthy eating. You may tell yourself that you’re too busy or that you have more important things to do than shop for and make healthy meals.

But healthy eating doesn’t have to take a lot of time. You can make a healthy meal just as quickly as an unhealthy one. You just need to plan, have the right foods on hand, and learn how to cook some quick and healthy meals.

Ask friends or coworkers who eat healthfully how they find time.
Get family members to help you chop vegetables or make a salad.
Find a cookbook or recipes for quick, healthy meals.
Take a cooking class with a friend or loved one.

Sometimes a food that seems like a good choice may not be so healthy. A “low-fat” cookie may have less fat, but it may have as much sugar and as many calories as a regular cookie. Potato chips that are “cholesterol free” may still have a lot of fat, calories, and salt.

Use the Nutrition Facts label on packaged, canned, and frozen foods to help you make healthy choices. The label lists the nutrients, including the fat, salt, and sugar in each serving, and it tells you how many servings are in the package.

Find out more about health claims on food labels.

If you want to learn more, talk with your doctor or meet with a registered dietitian.

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Sport nutrition questions and answers

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Can I eat more when I’m doing lots of exercise?

If you’re doing lots of exercise, you’ll use more energy each day than if you did little or none. So if you don’t want to lose body fat, you need to eat more food each day.

But still make sure that you have a balanced diet. Aim for larger portions of carbohydrate-rich foods such as wholegrain pasta, rice, sweet potato, porridge and breakfast cereals.

Is it better to eat a diet high in starchy carbohydrates or protein when I’m training?

Carbohydrates are the fuel that power your exercise regime.
Protein is needed in moderate amounts for muscle growth and repair, but the main form of energy used during exercise is carbohydrates.

Carbohydrates are the most important fuel for muscles, and an essential energy source for the brain and central nervous system.

Carbohydrates are stored as glycogen in the muscles and liver. These stores are small, so a regular intake of carbohydrate is necessary to keep them topped up. Low glycogen stores will result in poor performance and increase the risk of injury.

The proportions of carbohydrate and protein required will vary depending on the sport, so it’s best to seek advice from a qualified professional on your individual requirements.

How should I time my meals and snacks around exercise?

Once you’ve eaten a meal or snack, allow between one and four hours to pass before you start exercising. Your body needs time to digest. The amount of time will depend on the amount of food you’ve eaten.

If it’s an average meal, eating around two hours before you exercise works well. The meal should be high in carbohydrate, low in fat and low to moderate in protein. Too much protein or fat will slow down the movement of foods from the stomach, and will make you feel uncomfortable.

Food and drink also plays a part in recovering effectively from training. Good recovery is crucial to prevent a midweek slump in energy levels, and to aid muscle growth and repair. When you finish training, aim to have a carbohydrate-rich food or drink within 30 minutes.

Do I need to drink when I exercise?

Dehydration is when the water content in your body falls too low. It can have a major effect on exercise performance. It’s important to start any exercise session well hydrated. Do this by drinking water, squash or diluted fruit juice regularly during the course of the day.

For any exercise that lasts longer than 30 minutes, drink fluid while you’re doing it. The more you sweat, the more you’ll need to drink.

Water is usually enough for low-intensity exercise up to 50 minutes. For higher-intensity exercise lasting more than 50 minutes, or lower-intensity exercise lasting hours, a sports drink would be of benefit.

The carbohydrates in a sports drink will help to maintain energy levels, and the salt helps to keep you hydrated.

My friend exercises to lose weight, but I exercise to build muscle. Should our diets be different?

Yes. To lose weight, or more specifically body fat, the amount of energy that you consume has to be less than the amount of energy you burn. You’ll need a diet and exercise regime that makes this happen.

There are key steps you can take to reduce the energy content in your daily diet. Reduce fat, which is the most concentrated source of energy, and reduce alcohol. Eat fewer sugary foods, such as sweets, chocolates, cakes, biscuits and sugary drinks, and eat regular but smaller portions of complex carbohydrate foods, such as wholegrain bread, rice and pasta.
Protein foods such as chicken, fish, lean red meat and low-fat dairy foods should be included in moderate amounts. Eat lots of fruit and vegetables. It’s important to control portion sizes, too.

But to build muscle you need to combine resistance training (also called strength training) with a diet that includes enough energy to enable your body to make muscle.

This energy should come mainly in the form of carbohydrate-rich foods, but you’ll also need a little more protein to provide muscle. Large amounts of protein aren’t required.

A particularly effective approach is to eat small amounts of protein and carbohydrate before and after the resistance training session. A low-fat milkshake can work well.

Should I take extra supplements when I’m playing sport?

There are many different supplements on the market. Some of them are based on solid research, and others aren’t. Athletes need to consider supplements with extreme caution. In the past, some supplements were found to have been contaminated with banned substances.
First, ensure that you have a balanced, healthy diet that suits your sport. Consult a registered dietitian or nutritionist with expertise in sports nutrition. They can assess this and advise you on particular supplements.

For more info visit nhs.com

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